Friz

Introduction to Friz

Intro Video

Gameplay

The Field and Times

This game is played with a 175 gram ultimate style playing disc. No particular disc is specified at this time. The game has two 30 minutes halves made up of two 15 minute quarters each. Between quarters, players get a brief break 5 minutes. Between halves, players will get a longer break, no more than 20 minutes. Players will also swap sides of the field at the end of each half. During penalty shots and retrieving Discs the time is stopped, but if a referee is not available, play should continue without stoppages and quarters are extended by 2 extra minutes to account for stoppages. The field should be located on a relatively flat area and to make this field you will need to be able to make field lines that are easily visible and cause minimal interference with the disc. These lines can be made with spray paint, chalk or field straps. You should be able to bounce the Disc well on your field, so you will want a hard ground field, turf fields and short cut grass usually works fine. The field will consist of two parallel lines 60 ft long and 25 ft apart from each other. These are referred to as the Field of Play (FoP) lines. At the end of the FoP lines, there should be a line perpendicular to the FoP lines connecting the ends. These lines are referred to as the Pitch Lines. There should also be another set of lines parallel to the Pitch Lines, but offset 5 ft inwards. These are referred to as the Penalty Lines and the 50’x25’ rectangular region encompassed by the FoP lines and the penalty lines is referred to as the Bounce Zone (See red highlighted region on the field diagram). The 5’x25’ rectangular areas encompassed by the Penalty Lines, Pitch Lines, and a portion of the FoP Lines are referred to as the Penalty Boxes (See field diagram). At each corner where a FoP line meets a Pitch Line, there should be another line extending outward and widening the area by 120 degrees from the Pitch Line or 150 degrees from the FoP Line which would be the standard measurement for play (This is adjustable based on desired gameplay).  The widened area beyond the Pitch Lines make up the Score Zones on either end. The 40’ angled lines make up the sides of the Score Zones and also represent the furthest point in which the disc can enter the Score Zone. Sanctioned gameplay would include flags at the end of the scorezone to facilitate calls made at the back of the Score Zone. A detailed image of the Friz field is depicted in Figure 1 at the end of the rulebook. It is also important to understand how a call proceeds when a disc hits a line. If the disc lands or bounces on a line throughout the game, the contact is considered inside the box on which the line is part of the perimeter. Some lines are shared between Zones. Players only need to remember that the Penalty Zone has priority meaning that if disc contact occurs on a line shared with the penalty box, then the call is “in favor” of the penalty box or as if the contact was within the penalty box.

The Basics

First, you must be able to bounce a Disc. Note that this is not the same as an air bounce. In order to bounce a Disc, in basic principle, the Disc must contact the ground in a manner in which the contacting edge is moving in an opposing direction to the ground with the respect to the center of the Disc. In other words, the Disc should hit the ground against the spin of the Disc which will cause the Disc to bounce back into flight. If the Disc hits the ground with the spin of the Disc, it will cause it to roll. Friz is a generally played as a two player game but can be adjusted to accommodate a doubles style play or team play. In the standard two player style each person will stand behind their respective Pitch Line. A point is scored if the player successfully bounces the Disc within the Bounce Zone and lands the Disc in the opposing player’s Score Zone or causes the opposing player to drop the Disc while standing in their Score Zone. A successful bounce will be described further in the rulebook. The Disc is thrown back in forth in between opposing players regardless of scoring, meaning that there is not a reset, as in tennis after a point is scored. The flow of the game is to be continuous despite scoring, height rules, or penalties unless it is a third penalty. In which case, Penalty Shots will pursue. When the Disc is thrown the first bounce must be within the bounce zone, the 50 ft long rectangular section between the penalty boxes. Any legal offensive throw is called a pitch. The only criteria that a throw must follow in order to be a legal pitch is that the initial ground contact with the disc must be in the bounce zone. If it does not meet the criteria it will result in a penalty. Penalties are further described in a later section. A pitch can still be considered Out of Play and result in neither a score nor a penalty. The Disc must first bounce inside the bounce zone and before the opponent’s Penalty Line. Additional bounces after the first bounce inside the opponent’s penalty box are acceptable and still in play. Additional bounces after the first bounce outside of the Bounce Zone are acceptable and still in play as long as they bounce before the opposing player’s Pitch Line. If any bounce after the first are outside of the Bounce Zone and beyond the opposing player’s Pitch Line, it is considered Out of Play and is not considered a penalty. Essentially, the game is played in a continuous flow fashion where the Disc is thrown back and forth to each other in an effort to score.

The game should commence with a disc flip where the other player will call heads or tails on the toss. The player that wins the toss will either decide which player will start the game with the disc or which side they would like to defend first. Whichever option is chosen, the opposing player is awarded the decision for the other option. For example if Player A wins the toss and chooses the take the disc first, then Player B is awarded the decision as to which side they will defend first. The goal of the game is to score points by having the disc bounce and then land in the opposing player’s Score Zone without the opposing player catching it or if the opposing player drops the Disc while having either foot in their Score Zone. If this is done, 1 point will be awarded to the player that threw the Disc. At the same time, each player has a defensive priority to catch incoming discs to prevent the opposing player from scoring. At the end of a quarter a disc will be in play as long as it is released before the time ends.

In the event of a tie at the end of the 4 quarters of play, the tiebreaker rules will commence. Tiebreaker rules begin with a disc flip just like the start of the game. One player calls heads or tails. The winner of the toss has the option to pick their side they would like to defend or which player play offense first. Whichever decision the toss winner decides to declare, the opposing player is awarded to deferred to for the other decision. For example if Player A wins the toss and chooses the take the disc first, then Player B is awarded the decision as to which side will be the defending side for both players. Once that decision is made, the receiving player will take his place on the defending side while the offensive player will go to the Pitch side and proceed with 5 Pitches from the Pitch Line as opposed to the Penalty Line as they would for Penalty shots. The defending player will initiate the start of each Pitch by signaling his ready. After 5 pitches are made, the players will switch sides so that both players defend the same side and the previously defending player will proceed with their 5 pitches. Whomever scores more out of their respective 5 pitches will win. If a tie results again this procedure will be repeated, however, Pitches will be made from the penalty line as opposed to the pitch line after the first round of Tie Breaker protocol.

Penalties and Penalty Shots

It should be understood that whenever the disc is thrown whether it is a penalty or not, the opposing player then has control of the disc unless a third Penalty is accrued, in which case Penalty Shots will be served immediately and time is stopped during penalty shots. If the first bounce is not within the Bounce Zone, it is a penalty to the player that threw it. If the Disc does not enter the field of play at all, it is a penalty to the player that threw the Disc. If a player standing outside of their respective Score Zone while throwing the Disc it is a penalty to the player that threw it. If the Disc is caught with any body part maintaining contact inward of the Pitch Line, it is a penalty to the player that caught the Disc. If a player is standing inward of the Pitch Line when the opposing player’s pitch makes first contact within the Bounce Zone, then that player standing inward of the Pitch Line will receive a Penalty. If a player acquires three penalties then opposing player is awarded three penalty shots which consist of three consecutive throws followed by one more throw to initiate timed gameplay again. Penalty shots are played out in each player’s respective sides during the quarter in which the penalty shots were accrued. During the penalty shots the offensive player may make their throw from as far up as the Penalty Line. Each penalty shot will be initiated by the defending player by signaling his ready. Penalties cannot be accrued by the offensive player during Penalty shots, but rules for a successful Pitch still apply. After the penalty shots are finished the player who was awarded penalty shots will also receive the initial throw to resume regular play. In the case of continuous game-clock play, if the quarter ends during penalty shots, the shots will continue until finished and the player awarded penalty shots will commence the start of the next quarter even if the penalized player would normally start the next quarter as in the case of the start of the second half.  After the three penalty shots are finished the player who originally acquired the three penalties will return to a zero count for penalties and will only incur penalty shots for every third penalty that is acquired. At halftime penalties are reset to zero for both players. Additionally, players must make a pitch within a reasonable time or “shot clock”. The offensive player would be given 10 seconds to make a pitch and time would start once the player in ready. “Ready” would be when the offensive player is within their respective score zone with the disc in hand. From this point the player has a 10 second shot clock. If the player is called on this offense then the player would initially be warned then the subsequent offenses would result in 1  “Delay of Game” penalty per offense. Players may also receive warnings or penalties for intentionally delay of game when receiving penalty shots in continuous style gameplay if not signaling their ready in a timely manner.

Out of Play

After a Disc is considered Out of Play, no point will be awarded and no penalty will be issued. The Disc must first bounce inside the bounce zone and before the opponent’s Penalty Line. Additional bounces after the first bounce inside the opponent’s penalty box are acceptable and still in play. Additional bounces after the first bounce outside of the Bounce Zone are acceptable and still in play as long as they bounce before the opposing player’s Pitch Line. If any bounce after the first are outside of the Bounce Zone and beyond the opposing player’s Pitch Line, it is considered Out of Play and is not considered a penalty. Essentially, the game is played in a continuous flow fashion where the Disc is thrown back and forth to each other in an effort to score. A Disc may also be considered Out of Play if it is unanimously called as a Height Rule. If the Pitch is too high for the opposing player to reasonably catch the Disc within their respective Score Zone, then a height rule is called and it is neither a point nor a penalty. The Disc is considered Out of Play and the player who just received the Pitch on which the Height Rule was called now has control of the Disc. A Disc may also be called Out of Play when the Pitch makes an additional bounce beyond the Penalty line, but outside of the Field of Play. The disc will also be categorized as Out of Play if it maintains contact with the ground while passing through the Pitch Line. These types of Out of Play calls are generally in the form of Rolls or Skids. If the Disc slides across the Pitch Line, it is referred to as a Skid and is considered out of play. If the Disc rolls across the Pitch Line, it is referred to as a Roll and it is considered Out of Play. Additionally, if the disc is a legal pitch and the bounce flies to the end of the bounce zone it must fly to the inside of the flags at the back of the bounce zone. If the disc fly’s by the outside then the pitch is “out of bounds”. Furthermore, if the disc hits the flag pole and falls to the inside it is a score and outside is out of bounds. If the disc lands on the line after hitting the flag then majority of the disc rules.

Points

If a pitch is thrown and the opposing player misses it or drops it then the throwing player is awarded a point. If the player has any foot in the scoring area and touches the Disc but does not catch it, then a point is awarded. If the player touches the disc with no foot inside the scoring area then it is not a goal, this is considered Out of Play. If the Disc is hit out of play while the player is in the air and lands outside of the Score Zone, it will not be considered a score, but if he lands in his Score Zone it is considered a score. Disc contact with any field lines are considered in bounds. Taking this into consideration, contact with the Penalty and Pitch lines are considered to be within the Penalty box bounds. If the player drops the Disc with either of their feet inside of the scoring zone, then the pitching player is awarded a point.

Diagram of Friz Field with Dimensions

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